Tips on Cooking Both a Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey and a PCB

Why does it take half a day to cook a Thanksgiving turkey?  The answer is simple ― you have 20 lb of bird that simply cannot just be nuked in a microwave like last night’s dinner.  If not properly thawed, prepared and monitored, you either have an overcooked, dried-out bird or worse: Salmonella. Strangely enough, as you will see in a moment, PCBs are not that much different.

Let’s say you skip the thawing process and in your haste stick a frozen bird in the oven.  What happens?  The bird may look properly cooked on the outside, but as soon as you try your skill with the carving knife, you either hit bedrock or the inside is completely raw. OK, I will admit I speak from personal experience on this one (please do not bring this up with my wife).  Are PCBs any different?  Well, your reflow profile has a preheat phase, with the purpose of bringing your PCB to temperature. In other words, the entire mass of the board with all its components is gradually brought to equilibrium. If you do not do this, you run the risk of thermally shocking your components when they hit reflow and peak.  Thawing your bird and preheating your PCB ― you have the same objective in mind.

So, for the vast majority of us, we really have no idea when the turkey is fully cooked until getting an internal reading. A PCB is no different. On the surface, both might look great, but upon closer inspection, you discover some components have defects due to improper reflow or, for that matter, when you cut into a turkey that is still pink it really hits home that you aren’t cooking a TV dinner.

turkey-in-Spec_SM01

Because of this, as we all know, a 20 lb turkey requires a thermometer. I will concede that some of you use the old “poke the bird and check for pink until done” trick. Let’s assume you are not as skilled, like me, for example. Would you seriously cook a turkey by relying solely on the oven’s temperature reading on your stovetop?  Of course not, but why do some of you profile your PCB by relying on your reflow oven’s reported readings? Are either situation that much different?  Actually, yes. Your nice self-contained turkey cooking oven is more of a steady state, but there remains a large difference between what is reported by the oven and the internal temperature of your turkey. In contrast, your PCB is exposed to anything but a steady state environment because it rides on a conveyor through different heated zones with blowers, extraction systems and both ends of the oven even open to the elements!  For this reason, any oven manufacturer will adamantly tell you to profile and with regularity. Alright, you may have learned how to cook a turkey in your Mama’s kitchen and, in fact, be skilled at not using a thermometer; however, I doubt any serious SMT manufacturer would take a similar approach, checking your PCBs regularly for “doneness” in your reflow process.

What about placing the fate of your Thanksgiving feast on the cheap-o plastic pop-up indicator that likely came with the turkey? Do not laugh. How many of us use the trailing wires that came with the reflow oven?  Now to be fair, both work in principal; otherwise, you would have the likes of Purdue Farms with food poisoning lawsuits on their hands, but they only give you ballpark readings in many cases. By design, the turkey is going to be a little overdone and dried out.  Your PCB, on the other hand, cannot afford to be a little overdone or it is simply OUT of spec.  You can get by with eating the overcooked turkey … the gravy and mashed potatoes are there to make up for less than a perfectly cooked bird. But your PCB will not be as forgiving.  Trailing wires, never mind being cumbersome to use, have a tendency to kink and stretch, which compromise their readings.  They also are susceptible to 50 or 60 cycle noise from some reflow oven environments, further questioning their accuracy in some cases.

So you want to cook the perfect bird. Who doesn’t? So you pony up for a stainless steel large-dial meat thermometer to accurately read the internal temperature of your 20 lb bird. You also pony up for a KIC Explorer with Navigator because you want to create the perfect deep-in spec reflow profile. It will not only tell you the specific temperature of the joints of your $500 BGAs, but it also will find a balance that does not overcook them or any of your other temperature-sensitive components on the PCB.  No pop-up indicator profiler needs to apply since the KIC Explorer with Navigator will go the extra mile and tell you not only if you are in-spec but how DEEP in-spec your profile is, along with what can you do to improve the profile in minutes, if not seconds.  Now do you know of any turkey thermometers that can do that?

So when you prepare your Thanksgiving turkey, and as you pause to give thanks, consider applying the same care and consideration that you have given to your family’s feast as you do to your PCBs.

Happy Thanksgiving – Profilingguru

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Reducing Reflow Product Changeover Time

2009 Presentation at SMT Long Island on how to reduce the changeover time from one reflow profile recipe to another.  If you ever opened up your reflow oven to dump all its heat to lessen downtime, this 4 min video is for you!!!

To view the complete video series (click here).

To subscribe to my Podcast for iTunes (click here).

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SMT related Links to know

RSS feeds, Tweets, blogs and newsletters, how do you keep up?   Well here is the latest on what’s available in the SMT industry.   I subscribe to all of these newsletters and regularly pick out areas of interest related to profiling for you.   I also comb the blogs though I only know of two, not including profilingguru, which is quite remarkable considering other industries have hundreds if not thousands.   The SMTA group forum on LinkedIn yields on occasion a nugget, but you need to build a profile to join.  SMTnet has always been a jewel.  Lastly, Twitter is a new phenomenon for many of us.   I am still trying to get the knack of it myself but it does have some value no doubt and will continue to grow.

On-line Newsletters:

Circuitnet

Electronics Production World

EMS Now

GlobalSMT

PCB Update

SMT Week

Blogs:

Circuits Assembly

Forums:

SMTA on LinkedIn

SMTnet

Twitter:

Circuit Assembly

Global SMT

SMT Magazine

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Four Ways to Reduce your Reflow Oven’s Power Consumption

What are you paying annually in electricity to run your reflow oven?  Not taking into account indirect costs, surcharges, taxes and added wear and tear of running your oven hotter and harder, you might be paying anywhere from $6-8K per line.   This number is based off a study conducted at Flextronics Poland, where they pay close to the US national average of $.072 kWh.

Pop Quiz: Can you rank the following in order of impact on lowering your utility bill for your reflow oven?

  • Taking Oven Control Measures
  • Peak-time Power Up Minimization
  • Off-Peak Savings
  • Profiling for Energy Savings

Well if you are savvy with your utility bill, you probably identified Peak-time Power up Surcharges as the biggest money drain.  You probably did not guess Profiling for Energy Savings as the #2 energy savings technique.

Before I take you through all four techniques, keep in mind there are dozens of variables that come into play.  The numbers I use for one municipality and/or manufacturer may be vary by location, but the point should not be lost that you can save money and not sacrifice quality production in the process.  As an added bonus many of these techniques may also prolong the life of your oven and have other hidden benefits that may impact your operation.

#1:  Peak time Power Up Minimization

The following represents a fairly typical energy ramp up of a reflow oven from a dead cold state.   Many manufacturers will use the default start up to quickly get your reflow oven up to temperature and stabilized for production.  Thanks to BTU for providing the following data.

Peak Power Up 1

Now compare this to an energy savings ramp up mode for the same oven.

Peak Power Up 2

By extending your oven warm up time by only ~15 mins, there is a 15 KW difference in the peak energy output.   Many municipalities will charge a monthly surcharge based off of whatever happen to be your peak electricity use over typically a 5-15 min period.   So if you happen to turn on all your reflow ovens at the same time, AC, coffee machine, PCs, etc., you are in for a big added surcharge on your utility bill that month.

Potential Savings:

Let’s say you are in South Carolina, Duke Energy charges $13.16  KW as a peak surcharge.  Your monthly savings would be  $198 per month.  Of course if you have more than one oven this savings will be even more significant.

Bonus:

Many smaller manufacturers that perhaps have a single reflow oven, may be close to maxing out on their service.  I’ve seen more than one case of a 100 amp facility paying anywhere from $15K – 25K to upgrade to 200 amps.  As an example, a 9 zone Heller oven will run at 100 amps at full throttle when heating up, but you can set the oven to heat up in an energy savings mode, knocking your power down to about 63 amps.  Suddenly you don’t have to go out and install more service by just making a software change.  I know that all the major oven manufacturers that sell to about 80% of the US market (BTU, Heller, Speedline, Vitronics Soltec) have this feature, so check it out.

#2:  Profiling for Energy Savings

After 5 years,  evidence is pretty conclusive that smart profiling optimization tools can reduce reflow oven energy consumption by as much as 15%.  The following three studies demonstrate where power meters were used to measure  a “before” profile to an optimized “after” profile, using KIC Navigator-Power or KIC Auto-Focus Power.

There are basically three steps that should not take more than 15 mins to complete:

Step 1: Audit your SMT line speed.  You want to determine where is your bottleneck.  It is not uncommon to find the reflow oven running faster by 20% or more to the slowest system on your line such as the pick and place or screen printer.

Audit

John VanMeter of DG Marketing timing the line

Step 2: Run a profile

Profile

KIC Explorer 7 CH

Step 3: Run KIC’s power optimization feature in KIC Navigator.   As an process engineer I would set up your minimum allowable conveyor speed in the software above your bottleneck speed.   For example, if your current line speed is 30 in/min and an audit reveals your screen printer is running at 20 in/min, set your tolerance in the software to 23 inches.  You don’t need to make your reflow oven a possible bottleneck!   Lastly, you have the freedom to set the maximum allowable process window index (PWI).  In other words, if you know your oven can handle using up to 70% of your available spec, without any drift/variability causing you to go at times out of spec, you know your limit.   It really depends on the personality of your reflow oven.

Optimization

Potential Savings:

Based off the Flextronics Poland study cited above which was conducted on a Heller 1912 EXL  manufactured in 2005 and using a kWh rate of $.076 which is practically dead on to the US national average, results in $1062 in annual savings.  Which depending on the state of manufacturing can be as high as $2472 annually per oven.   15% savings which was the case at Flex Poland, is not unusual as you will see similar results in the Delta study in Arkansas to be released in October’s issue of  Global SMT.

Bonus:

Added features to having KIC’s optimization software Navigator-Power or Auto-Focus-Power are the additional tools you now have for decreasing defects.   It is hard for me to know what it costs you each time you send a PCB to rework, the cost of time spent profiling when you should be making on-time deliveries and the stress and aggravation of trying to produce a run of a 100 boards when your customer wants all 100 back!  Auto-Focus power allows you to make a very good first guess profile of new board before you even profile!  You can find discussions on these tools throughout this blog.

#3:  Off-Peak

Off-peak hours vary widely per locale.   Also depending on the time of year it can vary.   Nevertheless, if it is possible to run even a portion of reflow production in off-peak hours your costs kWh can sometimes be half of on-peak prices.   I like to use the same rate chart example give above for S. Carolina where Duke Energy charges between 2pm – 6 am, $.0297 kWh vs. $.0563 kWh.  Many of us logistically may not have in place a night shift, but most of us can certaintly take advantage of production after 2pm.   This is more an issue of smart planning, an exercise in management.

Potential Savings:

If you can schedule a quarter of your production off-peak, and by doing so are able to reduce your rate per kWh by half  which is possible in some municipalities your savings could be on the order of $62-74 per month per reflow oven.  I came up with this number by again using the Flextronics study as a guide, where they are paying a kWh rate similar to the US national average and shelling out between $5.8K – 7K per year per reflow oven.

#4:  Oven Control Measures

By buddy Bob Powledge of DG Marketing out of San Antonio, Texas likes to say, “sure the heck cheaper to blow air than to heat it up!”  I agree and there are studies to prove it.   Basic physics comes into play.  It you can move more heated air over a surface, it will heat up more efficiently and faster.   This is why squirrel cages have by and large gotten bigger over the years and other technologies such as static pressure have come about.   In one study conducted by BTU who plays around with the idea of static pressure another approach at improving heat transfer rates, the same set-points could increase temperatures by as much as 5C  by only changing static pressure.   Take this to the next step in our discussion, you can thus REDUCE your oven set-points by that same amount thus reducing electricity usage.  Just a word of caution.  If you use blowers, you don’t want to crank them up too much unless you like moving components across your PCBs.  Many ovens have precision controls for this reason while others offer this as an add on option.

Static Pressure

Potential Savings:

I have to take a wild guess in what this translates into dollars since there has not been a study specifically addressing what this means in terms of electricity savings.  Considering we have so far been able to build cost models from the profiling studies we can extrapolate some reasonable numbers.   In the Delta study, the cumulative setpoint change across their 8 zone Vitronics Soltec oven was 198 C.  If you run through each zone, some zones like Z1 there was no change, but when you get to Z5 the delta was 50C!  So how do you compare both?  If you achieve a 5C reduction across 8 zones or cummulatively 40C and you compare this to our 198C study, this would represent 20% difference.  So take our numbers from our profiling study and cut them down to 20%.  Remember in the national average example, you could expect $88 in mountly savings per reflow oven, therefore for this example we might see about 20% of that number or $17 per month per reflow oven.   I please welcome any oven manufacturer to share the results of a study that questions these assumptions since some guesswork is involved.

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Increasing Silicon Solar Efficiency Manufacturing

Global Solar Technology printed an article on Sept 16, 2009 highlighting an exciting ground breaking study that shows by optimizing the profile during the wafer firing process, a significant gain of .51% is achievable.  .51% is HUGE, which can easily translate into hundreds of thousands of dollars in increased revenues per solar manufacturing line.  That’s even in today’s depressed silicon market.

(Click here to view full article)

The thermal process of the wafer is one of the keys to achieving improved efficiencies. Drying steps are expected to remove most of the solvent used in the pastes before entering the firing zones. Solar cell metallization generally follows a spike profile type. Wafers only see peak temperature for approximately 1-4 seconds based on wafer and metallization chemistries. The most important steps include the clean burnout of the organics in the paste followed by etching through the silicon nitride (or other) passivation/ARC layer and, ultimately, the formation of good ohmic contact between the sintered silver and the very top layer of n-type silicon. These all lead to low contribution from series resistance and recombination resulting from the formation of the contacts. Control of this profile will become more crucial as the emitter depth decreases with increasing sheet resistance. Both uniformity of diffusion and furnace will be necessary to achieve the desired efficiency improvements.

The article walks you step by step through the study, here is an extend excerpt from the article related to profiling:

The base line profile on these wafers had been developed prior to the project based on extensive knowledge of the paste chemistry and years of practical experience with the metallization process. The base line profile can be seen in dark blue in Figure 1. For the base line test, as with all the subsequent process improvement tests, the wafers were processed at the same time and fired under the same conditions. Ten wafers were run through the furnace within a short period of time, and all were subjected to the same profile. After firing, we measured the cell efficiency in our continuous lamp tester. The average efficiency for the base line profile was 15.53 percent, as can be seen in Figure 2 (η Cell). Based on the type of wafer that was selected for this study, and the fact that a continuous lamp tester was used rather than a flash tester, this efficiency number was considered good. Now we wanted to make it better.

kic_article_1

Figure 1: The wafer profiles for each group

It is important to acknowledge that what we were trying to accomplish was not to find a single “golden” profile for the wafers, but rather the optimal thermal process window. The Heraeus paste SOL9235H is a very robust paste that can perform well throughout a range of profiles. Establishing a thermal process window will set the upper and lower limits for the wafer’s peak temperature, time above certain temperature levels, etc. within which the cell efficiencies will be highest.

Figure 2: Cell efficieny testing

Figure 2: Cell efficieny testing

Figure 3: Boxplot of cell efficiencies for base wafer profile

Figure 3: Boxplot of cell efficiencies for base wafer profile

Since we did not yet know the upper and lower limits to our process window, we used the base line profile as a starting point, and we initially set relatively wide process limits around it as shown in Figure 4. The profiler software always measures how well the profile fits the chosen process window with a single number called Process Window Index (PWI). The PWI number is 100 percent when the profile is at the edge of the process window. The lower the number, the closer the profile is to the center of the process window. A PWI of 0 percent represents a profile at the very center of the process window.

Figure 4: Original Process Window

Figure 4: Original Process Window

Our KIC profiler also has profile simulation software that allowed us to change the furnace zone temperatures or conveyor speed in the software, and to immediately predict the resulting wafer profile. For the first process improvement step, we suspected that a higher peak temperature would benefit the metallization. We tried a few zone temperature changes in the software and studied the software simulation of the corresponding profile before settling on a 10°C increase in the furnace peak zones (Zone 5 and 6). Once the furnace stabilized on the new settings, we ran a set of 10 wafers for our Group 2 test. The average cell efficiency increased from 0.40 to 15.93 percent. For Group 3, we increased the peak temperatures settings in zones 5 and 6 another 10°C, but the average cell efficiency of the 10 wafers dropped by 0.12 percent.

For the Group 4 test, we set the zones back to the Group 2 level and reduced the furnace conveyor speed. The prediction software showed the impact on the wafer profile both in terms of peak temperature changes and, in particular, in terms of time above the various temperature levels shown in Figure 4. Due to this, we reduced the conveyor speed from 200 to 190″/min. The average cell efficiencies increased yet another 0.11 percent above the Group 2 numbers to a cell efficiency of 16.04 percent. Our final test for Group 5 kept the temperatures stable but increased the conveyor speed from 190 to 210″/min. That dropped the average cell efficiency by 0.16 percent.

Figure 5: e-Clispe TC attachment fixture

Figure 5: KIC's e-Clispe TC attachment fixture

Conclusion

By systematically changing certain key profile dimensions, such as peak temperature and time above 500°C, we were able to identify the “sweet spot” in the metallization process. The PWI index and the profiler’s simulation software allowed us to quickly identify the appropriate furnace settings for profiles below, above and in the middle of the optimal settings. This sweet spot yielded an average cell efficiency of 0.51 percent higher than previous experiments had allowed.

The Heraeus SOL 9235H silver paste’s properties allow for high-efficiency processing in a range of profiles, hence a process window can be established around the “ideal” profile identified above. Heraeus now advices its clients to the appropriate process window for each application.

With modern profilers, solar cell manufacturers can adjust their furnace setup until the wafer profile is positioned within the suggested process window. Over time, the thermal process will drift due to a number of variables such as heating lamps changing as they get older, wear and tear in the furnace, conveyor speed drifts, exhaust changes, and more. It then is a simple task for the manufacturing engineer to run another profile, and to use the profiler process optimization software to identify the furnace settings that will yield the appropriate profile.

This method for process optimization depends on accurate and repeatable profile readings. One excessive noise in the profile readings historically has been caused by the attachment method for the TCs. Both cemented and dummy wafer TCs tend to measure the material used to secure the TCs in place, rather than to measure the surface of the wafer. Pinning the TC to the wafer with a weight suffers from non-repeatability. The fixture with flattened TC beads has worked well for us.

Finally, process optimization must be quick and easy enough to be useful for volume production lines, as opposed to only the laboratory line. There is little use in perfecting the process in the laboratory just to see the transfer to the production lines fail because the furnace properties are different. Once the correct process window is established, the high-volume furnaces can be adjusted within minutes, keeping production downtime to a bare minimum. This task must not only be performed during transfer from the lab to the production line, but it also must be performed periodically due to the drift in the thermal process that is a fact of life in any production line. The few minutes it takes to adjust the production furnaces for peak performance is richly rewarded by the ability to consistently produce higher efficiency cells.

Future Studies

The temperature readings taken by the e-Clipse TC attachment fixture are higher than historic readings taken by older TC attachment methods. A future study will focus on quantifying the accuracy and repeatability of the new profiling method as it relates to the theoretical true wafer surface temperatures.

More information: Bjorn Dahle, president of KIC, +1-619-300-5586.

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Save 15% in 15 minutes on your reflow’s energy consumption

Topic: 15% electricity savings in 15 minutes

Save Electricity in 15 mins. R0909B DRAFT

Date: Friday, September 25, 2009
Time: 1:00 pm, Pacific Daylight Time (GMT -07:00, San Francisco)
Meeting Number: 336 789 255
Meeting Password: (This meeting does not require a password.)

To join the online meeting
1. Go to https://kicthermal.webex.com/kicthermal/j.php?ED=107946437&UID=1013415122
2. Enter your name and email address.
3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
4. Click “Join Now”.
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Topic: 15% electricity savings in 15 minutes
Date: Friday, September 25, 2009
Time: 1:00 pm, Pacific Daylight Time (GMT -07:00, San Francisco)
Meeting Number: 336 789 255
Meeting Password: (This meeting does not require a password.)

——————————————————-
To join the online meeting

——————————————————-
1. Go to https://kicthermal.webex.com/kicthermal/j.php?ED=107946437&UID=1013415122
2. Enter your name and email address.
3. Enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
4. Click “Join Now”.
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

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Running lead free and eutectic PCBs simultaneously on the same reflow oven

Surface Mount Technology ran a piece titled Parallel Processes: Simultaneous Lead and Lead-free Soldering with a Single Reflow System written by Hans Bell of Rehm Thermal Systems GmbH.  Hans details a study where by controlling conveyor speed of each lane of a dual-lane system, it is possible to run both a lead and lead free product simultaneously.

The devil of course is always in the details:

Definition of the process window must always be based on the “weakest link,” namely the component with least amount of thermal stability during the soldering process. If two different processes are to be set up next to each other in the same reflow system, and if thermally sensitive components are included on the PCB, great flexibility is required for parameters configuration.

The ability to develop process windows for each product leaving enough room for each to call upon the same oven zone set points is key and of course taking into account special temperature tolerant components on each board.  Hans’ idea is intriguing.  Based on my experience in a world were many PCBs manufacturers struggle to profile or perhaps do not profile at all,  this is certainly a tall order.  Nevertheless his idea is do’able for perhaps many processes, since changing just the conveyor speed to reduce product changeover on a single lane oven is being done today (click here for an excellent application note using KIC product’s to achieve this end).  Why this couldn’t be adopted to a dual lane system running both lead and lead free simultaneously has its merits.

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No Waste: Beyond PCBs in Reflow Profiling

Article is from SMT Magazine

In many situations, EMS providers cannot waste a PCB for thermal profiling. Some ovens are equipped with profiling tools to generate an accurate reflow recipe without thermal profiling. This saves time, labor, money, and materials, but there are limitations.

By Brian O’Leary, KIC

There is a right way and a wrong way to set up a reflow oven to manufacture a new PCB assembly. This article suggests using the wrong method, but for the right reason. If an electronics manufacturer is prevented from following the correct method for setting up the reflow oven for a new production run, does a fallback position exist where they can still expect good results? For example, contract manufacturers find themselves in a not-so-uncommon situation where the manufacturer receives 100 boards and is expected to give a 100 assembled boards back. Sacrificing a single PCB to the profiling process is not an option. In another example, a manufacturer has PCBs that run in the several thousands of dollars. A suitable scrap board is not available for profiling, due to the cost incurred for the lost PCB.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Traditional Reflow Oven Set-up

The traditional method for setting up a reflow oven to manufacture a new PCB assembly is to attach thermocouples (TCs) to the PCB and run a series of profiles. Multiple profiles are usually required for the technician to adjust the oven recipe until an in-spec or deep in-spec profile is found. The introduction of lead-free assemblies has made this task more difficult and time-consuming. However, automatic prediction software and process optimization software have significantly cut down on the number of profile iterations required to determine the oven recipe that provides an in-spec process.

The benefit of this conventional reflow profiling method is clear: It achieves a deep in-spec and therefore stable process that is fundamental to good end-product quality. It also provides documentation to the client that proper process development work was performed.

These procedures, however, tend to sacrifice one or more PCBs. One reason for this concerns the TC attachment method. There are several TC attachment solutions, some more destructive to the PCB assembly than others. The use of high-temperature solder wire is a reliable method, but tends to damage the PCB assembly. Aluminum tape is also a reliable and repeatable method with the added benefit that the tape can be removed after the profile without damaging components.

year_Par_30864_Image_400_240_1

A second cause of PCB damage is the fact that each subsequent thermal cycle through the reflow oven raises the risk of latent or real defects as solder joints are re-reflowed, components are exposed to multiple reflow cycles, and the properties of the substrate changing. The PCB gets lighter, discolored, and more brittle with multiple profiles. Therefore, even with non-destructive TC attachment methods, such as aluminum tape, the PCB may need to be discarded when several profiles are run.

A final risk is that the technician selects, often guessing, a wrong initial oven recipe prior to the first profile. The initial recipe could damage the PCB. This could happen when the peak temperature is too high, the slope too steep, the soak prematurely dries out the volatiles in the paste, etc.

Profiling the Reflow Oven, Not the PCB

Modern reflow ovens are a far cry from their legacy siblings. Each oven model produced in volume tends to have very tight and similar thermal characteristics to each other. Equally important, these properties do not change over time as rapidly as in the past due to better flux management, improved oven control systems, more precise mechanics, etc. This enables new thermal process tools that “learn” the behavior of each oven model. To capture the thermal properties of a specific oven model, numerous profiles are run on a variety of PCB assemblies under differing process windows. This database will cover all but the most unusual applications encountered in SMT production. Once this work has been done, it is a simple matter of copying the information onto all the similar oven models. At that point, the operator could simply enter the basic information of the application, such as the length, width, and weight of the PCB assembly as well as the appropriate process window, and the oven will find its suitable recipe (zone temperatures and conveyor speed). This recipe will yield an in-spec profile in the vast majority of the cases without the need to run a profile or attach TCs. Experience with such technologies also suggests that when the recipe generated by the new thermal process tools does not yield an in-spec profile, it is usually very close.

Some U.S. oven manufacturers have completed this work. These reflow oven makers ship ovens with a fully functional database that essentially allows their customers to set up for new production runs without the need for profiling and sacrificing PCBs.

These systems do have limitations. The first was alluded to above, namely that there will be a small percentage of the applications that will not be processed in-spec. The fail-safe method is to wait for the oven to stabilize on the suggested recipe and then run an old-fashioned profile to verify whether it is in-spec. If out of spec, it should, in the vast majority of the cases, be close enough to achieve an in-spec profile on the second try. One profiling pass through the reflow oven, with aluminum tape used for TC attach, should not damage the PCB assembly.

year_Par_87154_Image_500_579_1

Another limitation is that an oven will, given enough time, eventually change its thermal properties. Wear and tear, changes in exhaust conditions, preventive maintenance, and a host of other factors will have an accumulative effect on the behavior of the reflow oven. Therefore, the initial database will need to be updated. This can be achieved by running some real-life profiles from time to time, and feeding this fresh information back into the database.

The final limitation is the fact that a system that eliminates profiling, by definition, does not have a profile recorded for the specific assembly. This means that there is no documentation or evidence that the PCB was indeed processed in-spec. Some customers will accept this, while others will not and require reflow profile documentation.

Conclusion

The correct method for reflow oven set up with a new application is to profile the PCB and dial the processed deep in-spec using prediction software. If the electronics manufacturer either cannot or will not perform this task, there are now thermal process tools available that achieve a more than 80% effective solution. Oven-inherent programming produces an in-spec recipe in the vast majority of the situations with no need to profile or sacrifice a circuit board. This technology also saves set up time and associated labor.

Using a profiling technology without an actual PCB profile run is also far better than doing nothing. Many manufacturers in our industry currently do not profile at all, or they limit their profiling to a single application a few times a year. If you do not want to do traditional profiling at all, oven-generated recipes can be an intermediary, rather than blindly reflowing.

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Plugging the Hole in the SMT Reflow Inspection Process

MB (Marybeth) Allen, General Manager of KIC Europe in an interview with Globalsmt.net makes a terrific case for RPI (Reflow Process Inspection). MB_Allen

Here are some excerpts:

Q. 2009 saw the introduction of your RPI In-Line Process Inspection System for SMT reflow ovens.  For manufacturers currently relying on AOI and X-Ray systems to carry out inspection functions, can you explain how this system works and why RPI should be the choice for this process?

Automated inspection systems have become critical in controlling quality throughout the manufacturing process.  SPI (solder paste inspection) and AOI (automated optical inspection) are excellent defect detection tools, within the limitations of their design.  The RPI (reflow process inspection) inspects the reflow process for each and every manufactured PCB.

The quality of a solder joint is not only a function of whether there was adequate solder, accuracy of placement, missing components etc., but that the solder was processed correctly.  For example, the peak temperature needs to be high enough, but not too high to damage the component; the time above liquidous must be within the required range etc.  The AOI machine is not designed to check for these critical events.

KIC’s RPI verifies that the PCBs have been manufactured within the required thermal process window.  Perhaps the best example of where RPI complements AOI is in the soldering of BGAs and other Area Array Packages, where the AOI machine cannot see the solder joints as they are hidden from view by the component body.  RPI even complements X-Ray machines as these inspection systems cannot tell whether the solder joints were processed in accordance with the required profile specs.

Q. So KIC RPI offers both oven and product data in one solution, this obviously enables the operator to harness this key data and use the yield charts to refine the process. What type of data do they receive and how easy is this to understand?

RPI automatically generates both Yield and DPMO (Defects Per Million Opportunities) production charts.  There’s really nothing for the customer to do as the information on all boards produced is captured automatically.  You’ve seen these charts in many factories showing product data for many steps in the manufacturing process.  However, previously data from the reflow process was missing.  Only reflow oven machine data was available.  KIC’s RPI now provides this missing key product process data, providing another key link to product quality.

Q. This product offers a timely solution for manufacturers in this tough climate and I understand it has already received awards for its innovation. What has been your feedback so far?

Yes, RPI has already received several awards around the world.    People are looking for a solution to save money and ensure continued quality control.  When I visit customers and prospective customers their initial questions or requests can be taken care of by using RPI.  It’s wonderful to be able to say “Yes, RPI can help you with that” to most of their requests.  We have plugged the hole in the inspection process.

For the full interview go to: http://www.globalsmt.net/content/view/7583/70/

Awards:

2009 EMAsia Innovation Award in the category of Process Control Software for its RPI in-line inspection system.

2009 NPI Award in the category of Process Control Tools for its RPI in-line inspection system.

Innovative Technology Center Award at Apex 2009

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Profiling BGA Webinar

Profiling BGA Webinar Supplemental (July 1, 2009):

Component Specific Specs

We discussed the need to define BGA specs separate from other components that have different reflow requirements.   BGAs typically require more heat to reflow properly but typically there are many other “smaller” components that also populate a PCB that will overheat if you develop your process solely around the BGA.   The following 2:40 min video reviews how you can bring both your BGAs and other temperature sensitive components into spec, striking a thermal balance that results in quality products.

Thermocouple Attachment

The following 1 min video shows one of the most reliable direct methods of TC attachment for BGA profiling.

…..but, who can always sacrifice a PCB in the process?   We talked about some indirect/non-destructive methods for profiling BGAs that are suggestive, but inconclusive.   In the fall I hope to have some results of a study that will help our industry come up with solutions that one can reasonably predict the temperature/profile of a BGA without destroying the PCB in the process or worse the BGA!

BGA Inspection

First there was SPI (solder paste inspection), then there was AOI, now there is RPI (Reflow Process Inspection)

rpi-smt-linerev-11

You can see a prior blog posting discussing RPI at:   http://profilingguru.com/reflow/what-is-reflow-process-inspection/

RPI works in the world of continuous reflow monitoring, where a profile is created for each and every production board.

In order to automate reflow profiling, a baseline/virtual profile is first established, where one runs a traditional profile with PCB, TC attachment and profiler while the on-board system of 30 thermocouples gathers the same profiling data and reconstructs and converts the traditional profile to a virtual representation. Once a virtual profile has been established, profiles can be collected for all production boards.  SPC charting, cPk, traceability and process control are all possible.

So rather then the reflow process being a black box, where anything and everthing can go wrong…..

illustration_5….alternatively, do you not only know what is going on continuously, but your BGAs using the techniques above are being monitored on a continuous basis.

reflow-yield_3in_nk

Your Questions:

Q: Doesn’t the thermocouples utilized by the oven itself (assuming that they are calibrated and verified) provide the same basic information as the secondary set of TCs you are referring to?

ANSWER:  No, the oven thermocouples and the secondary KIC  TCs have completely different and separate functions.  The oven TCs are typically located close to the heaters since their job is to turn the heaters on and off as the temperature drifts from the set points.  The KIC 24/7 (or KIC Vision) TCs, located along the conveyor, help to automatically measure the profile that each PCB experiences as it is processed through the reflow oven or wave solder machine.  This function is called Virtual Profiling.

Virtual Profiling (VP) provides process traceability as it logs the profile for each PCB, along with information on how this profile fits the established process window.  The VP works in real time and offers instant alarm when the process (profile) drifts out of spec.   Because it provides basic SPC charting, it acts as an early warning system for trouble ahead.  Think of the KIC24/7 or KIC Vision as an automatic profiling system in real time.

Q:  I encountered wetting issue with CSP and BGA, how do I solve them?   /   Q: How about wetting issue?

Answer; In some cases, but of course not all cases, wetting issues are a result of incomplete flux activation in the solder paste and an overall low temp soak, where the components did not reach sufficient energy levels before entering the reflow, TAL stage of the process. Many of these issues are related to Pb – free solder pastes, mixed RoHS components or a number of other variables.

I suggest that the best answer is to research the publications available on the Web for the most relevant solution. The following is a link that closely resembles the issue, but again, you will need to research the most relevant to your situation.

http://www.emsnow.com/cnt/files/White%20Papers/Henkel_Leadfree_Designing_Reliability.pdf

Q:  How do you take measurements on each board without TCs?

Answer: KIC software algorithms compare what was observed at the time of the Baseline Profile to what is present within the oven during production. Using the 30 thermocouples in the oven, this data is communicated to the eTPU and the output is the PWI based on the specific process and the specification of that process.

Q:  How well does the DPMO relate to the actual defect where there could be placement defects interacting with reflow?

Answer: DPMO is a parameter of only the thermal reflow process. If issues exist in placement or screen printing, it will not be reflected in the DPMO, since KIC is only monitoring the thermal process. Given that all other aspects of the SMT line is functioning properly, DPMO will give an assessment of the thermal defects assuming that the proper solder paste and placement is present at the time the product enters the oven.

Q:  What about paste formulations?

Answer: KIC works with any solder paste manufactures to build the solder paste library that is present in the KIC software. This library is updated periodically and verified by the solder paste manufactures in most instances. The library however does not at any one time contain all information about all possible solder pastes. We try our best to be certain the information is present, but changes in formulation and engineering at the solder pate manufactures sometimes causes gaps that are beyond our control.

Q: How important is it to drill into the BGA ball and put the TC in it, vs. putting on the package, slip under the package, and on the bottom side of the board?

Answer: There are many variables in PCB design and component placement that directly and indirectly affect other components, in this case BGA. The best possible answer to this question is in the amount of data that is collected, how it is collected and how this information is applied to the specific PCB and BGA directly. Gathering as much information as possible, charting this info and drawing data driven values is the best possible formula for successful BGA reflow. Using all available data collection methods and positions aids in successfully reflowing this package.

As indicated during the webinar, we are currently commissioning a study to see if non destructive methods can be used in place of drill a hole.

Q: Does your software always choose an extended peak recipe?

Answer: No. Based on the type of recipe and profiles that are part of your normal production determines what path the KIC Navigator (auto-prediction) directs the profile. If your profiles are mainly RTP, the software looks at the values of the library data and suggests set points that will lead to a RTS profile. If your profiles are largely RSS, then the suggested set points will tend towards a RSS profile.

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